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•Tooling and Compilation [clear filter]
Monday, September 25
 

11:00am

EA’s Secret Weapon: Packages and Modules
A lot of people hate build systems. What if using a library was just as easy as header-only libraries?

EA has had a Secret Weapon called “packages” for over 14 years. EA's Packages are like Ruby’s Gems or Perl’s CPAN or Rust’s cargo. If you build a package from the package server it will download all of its dependencies.

This talk will be about what we have learned about packages and versioning while building our large AAA games over the last 10+ years. Finally, what do we see for the future, like how will C++ modules fit in?

In detail I will talk about:
-Package layout
-Package server
-Versioning control and packages
-Libraries teams and platform fragmentation
-Packages' effect on large scale architecture
-C++ Modules TS prototypes

Speakers
avatar for Scott Wardle

Scott Wardle

Senior Software Engineer, Electronic Arts
Hi Everyone, | | I am Scott Wardle, I have been in games over 20 years, mostly at EA Vancouver. I like to solve hard problems. I am known for Systems Programming, C++ and turning my problems into solutions for everyone.



Monday September 25, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Harvard (406) Meydenbauer Center

11:00am

Time Travel Debugging: Root Causing Bugs in Commercial Scale Software

We’ve all heard horror stories about bugs that were near-impossible to root-cause, and many of us have at least a few stories of our own. Corrupted or uninitialized memory. Resource leaks. API misuse and race conditions. Occasional and inconsistent crashes where all you have to go on are a series of unhelpful crash dumps. These kinds of problems are often time-consuming and tedious to debug, and can be both draining and infuriating.

Time Travel Debugging (TTD) is a reverse debugging toolkit for Windows that makes debugging these kinds of problems far easier, in both small programs and commercial-scale software like Windows and Office.  It's been an invaluable debugging tool for software developers and escalation engineers within Microsoft for many years.  We’ve spent the last couple of years improving performance, scalability, and usability, and are excited to finally be able to release a public preview of Time Travel Debugging.

In this interactive and hands-on session, we'll show you how to download and make use of our first public preview of Time Travel Debugging, demonstrate how to use TTD, and walk through the root cause analysis of some typically difficult-to-solve bugs like memory corruption, API misuse, and race conditions.



Speakers
avatar for James McNellis

James McNellis

Senior Software Engineer, Microsoft
James is a senior engineer on the Windows Debugger team at Microsoft, where he works on the Time Travel Debugging (TTD) reverse debugging toolkit. Prior to joining the Debuggers team in 2016, he was a member of the Visual C++ team, where he was responsible for the Microsoft C Run... Read More →
avatar for Jordi Mola

Jordi Mola

Principal Software Eng Lead, Mircosoft Corp.
Jordi is a Principal Software Engineer Lead at Microsoft Corporation that has a passion for engineering productivity and efficiency. Except for a couple of years working on the Windows 8 copy UI, Jordi has spent his entire Microsoft career working on productivity tools, many of which are still internal to Microsoft. One of... Read More →
avatar for Ken Sykes

Ken Sykes

Principal Software Development Engineer, Microsoft
Ken is a Principal Software Developer at Microsoft Corporation and has worked on every consumer version of Windows since Windows 3.0. He recently joined the Windows Debugger team to help developers everywhere become more productive and maybe even make debugging a little bit fun... Read More →


Monday September 25, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
ENIAC (404) Meydenbauer Center

2:00pm

New standards to the rescue: the view through an IDE’s glasses
We often talk about how new language features can help developers to write more accurate and concise code. There is another type of discussion to be had on how tools help leverage language issues and support developers. How about quite a third perspective? Which is about how language can help tools to do better.

As C++ tools vendors, we use to share our experience with C++ language trickiness and peculiarities, including preprocessor and non-trivial parsing. It’s time now to talk about the view on the upcoming language changes through the IDE’s glasses.

In this talk I’ll identify the most important issues with the language from the IDE’s perspective and will show how new language standards, as well as other initiatives like C++ Core Guidelines, are helpful and beneficial to the IDEs. I’ll cover a variety of features from if constexpr to Concepts and Modules, as well as std2 and some other initiatives that are no more than proposals at this point. Come and see the language from our perspective.

Speakers
avatar for Anastasia Kazakova

Anastasia Kazakova

Product Marketing Manager, JetBrains
As a C and C++ software developer, Anastasia Kazakova created real-time *nix-based systems and pushed them to production for 8 years. She has a passion for networking algorithms and embedded programming and believes in good tooling. With all her love for C++, she is now the Product Marketing Manager... Read More →


Monday September 25, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Manchester (407) Meydenbauer Center

3:15pm

C++ Development with Visual Studio Code
Free, open-source and runs everywhere.

If you’re looking for a fast and lightweight code editor, Visual Studio Code has you covered. Come get an overview of Visual Studio Code along with the C++ extension that enables editing, building, and debugging your C++ code across Windows, Mac, and Linux.

Speakers
avatar for Rong Lu

Rong Lu

Senior Program Manager, Microsoft
Rong Lu is a Program Manager in the Visual C++ team at Microsoft. She has been working on the Visual Studio team for the past 10 years since she graduated with her master degree in computer science. She is currently working on Visual Studio tools for game development, Visual C... Read More →


Monday September 25, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Manchester (407) Meydenbauer Center

3:15pm

What's New and Upcoming in Visual Studio 2017 Updates
Visual Studio 2017 was released this year and brings all sort of new functionality for C++ developers on any platform, not just Windows. In this talk, we'll cover many of the new features of the latest update of Visual Studio 2017 and give you a preview of new features coming in a major update later in 2017 that we've never shared before since you came to visit our hometown! We'll cover the ongoing evolution of our compiler and libraries, giving you an update on our conformance work as well as performance, and build throughput. We'll talk about the new enhancements to our Linux targeting. We'll talk about brand new unit testing capabilities for major test frameworks. We'll talk about improved support for CMake and our Open Folder experience for getting full Visual Studio IDE support for code that doesn't have a project or solution file. We'll also walk you through some cool new productivity and debugger features.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Carroll

Steve Carroll

Visual C++ Development Manager, Microsoft Corporation
Steve Carroll is the dev manager for the Visual C++ team and previously the dev manager for the Visual Studio debuggers and profilers.
avatar for Daniel Moth

Daniel Moth

Group Program Manager, Microsoft
Visual Studio


Monday September 25, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Ferranti (403) Meydenbauer Center

4:45pm

Faster Delivery of Large C/C++ Projects with Conan Package Manager and Efficient Continuous Integration
Dependency information together with the smart management of binaries and binary compatibility of Conan package manager can be used to implement a modularized, fast and efficient Continuous Integration (CI) process for large C and C++ projects. This CI system knows what needs to be rebuilt, what can be built in parallel, and how to transparently manage build dependencies as testing frameworks or toolchains (such as cross-compilation to Android).

This talk will present a CI system, implemented for Jenkins (but which could be implemented in other CI systems too), that using the dependency graph provided by the package manager, is able to trigger dependent packages' build jobs, and only those transitively affected by the change, in the correct build order. Furthermore, the build jobs are arranged in concurrency levels, by the degree/ordering in the graph, but also for different configurations, so optimal build parallelism can be achieved. Also such dependent packages can define custom rules to decide to build themselves or not, depending on configuration or versioning criteria. Everything will be fully demonstrated in practical examples.

We will also present advanced CI techniques, such as how to create packages for tools, like testing frameworks, to lately inject them as build-requirements to other libraries. Moreover, the process can also automate the installation and transparent usage of complete toolchains, like cross compiling C/C++ to Android with the Android NDK toolchain, to achieve a process that is convenient for developers and highly repeatable.

Speakers
avatar for Luis Martinez de Bartolome

Luis Martinez de Bartolome

Software engineer. Conan co-founder, Jfrog
Luis is a full stack software engineer. He has spent the last 5 years mitigating the pains of C/C++ development flows & dependency management. Co-founder of Conan and a proudly Frog
avatar for Diego Rodriguez-Losada Gonzalez

Diego Rodriguez-Losada Gonzalez

SW Engineer, JFrog
Diego's passions are robotics and SW engineering and development. He has developed many years in C and C++ in the Industrial, Robotics and AI fields. Diego was also a University (tenure track) professor and robotics researcher for 8 years, till 2012, when he quit academia to try... Read More →


Monday September 25, 2017 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Harvard (406) Meydenbauer Center

5:20pm

Fuzz or lose: why and how to make fuzzing a standard practice for C++
Fuzzing is a family of testing techniques in which test inputs are generated semi-randomly. The memory unsafety of C++ has made fuzzing a popular tool among security researchers. Fuzzing also helps with stability, performance, and equivalence testing; and it’s a great addition to everyone’s CI.

Our team has launched OSS-Fuzz, the Google's continuous fuzzing service for open source software, and a similar service for our internal C++ developers. Over 1000 C++ APIs are being fuzzed automatically 24/7, and thousands of bugs have been found and fixed.

Now we want to share this experience with the wider C++ community and make fuzzing a part of everyone’s toolbox, alongside unit tests. We will demonstrate how you can fuzz your C++ library with minimal effort, discuss fuzzing of highly structured inputs, and speculate on potential fuzzing-related improvements to C++.

Speakers
avatar for Kostya Serebryany

Kostya Serebryany

Software Engineer, Google
Konstantin (Kostya) Serebryany is a Software Engineer at Google. His team develops and deploys dynamic testing tools, such as AddressSanitizer and ThreadSanitizer. Prior to joining Google in 2007, Konstantin spent 4 years at Elbrus/MCST working for Sun compiler lab and then 3 years at Intel Compiler Lab. Konstantin holds a PhD from mesi.ru and a Master from msu.ru. Twitter handle... Read More →


Monday September 25, 2017 5:20pm - 5:50pm
Colossus Theater Meydenbauer Center
 
Tuesday, September 26
 

8:00am

Package management for C++ OSS libraries on Windows with vcpkg
This session covers the new open source vcpkg system that simplifies acquiring and building unmodified open source libraries on Windows. Vcpkg does not require additional source code or prebuilt binaries, and the library catalog currently provides access to over 300 C++ libraries for different architectures, 90% of them added by the community.

The session covers how to use vcpkg to acquire and build open source libraries that you use within your project, and also how to add C++ libraries into the vcpkg catalog. Vcpkg is maintained at https://github.com/Microsoft/vcpkg/ and accepts contributions

Speakers
avatar for Eric Mittelette

Eric Mittelette

Program Manager, Microsoft
A Developer Evangelist since 2000, Eric has a focus on open source software and frameworks at Microsoft Open Technologies, Inc, he works now as a Senior Program Manager for the Visual C++ (VCLib). Eric has been passionate about code and algorithms since the 90's and works with C... Read More →


Tuesday September 26, 2017 8:00am - 8:45am
ENIAC (404) Meydenbauer Center

9:00am

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about DLLs
If you build software for Windows, you use DLLs, and it’s likely that you may build DLLs of your own. DLLs are the primary mechanism for packaging and encapsulating code on the Windows platform. But have you ever stopped to think about how DLLs work? What goes into a DLL when you build it, what happens when you link your program with a DLL, or how do DLLs get located and loaded at runtime? Many of us build and use DLLs without fully understanding them. In this session, we’ll give an in-depth introduction to DLLs and how they work.

We’ll begin by looking at what’s in a DLL—the kinds of things a DLL can contain and the basic data structures that are used—and the benefits and drawbacks of packaging code in a DLL. We’ll look at how DLLs are loaded, including the details of how the loader locates DLLs and maps them into the process; how dependencies are resolved among DLLs; and DLL lifetime and how DLLs get unloaded. We’ll also look at how DLLs get built, including what makes DLLs “special,” what goes into an import library, and how the linker uses import libraries. Finally, we’ll look at several other miscellaneous topics, including how DLLs interact with threads and thread-local storage, and mechanisms for solving or mitigating the dreaded “DLL hell.”

Speakers
avatar for James McNellis

James McNellis

Senior Software Engineer, Microsoft
James is a senior engineer on the Windows Debugger team at Microsoft, where he works on the Time Travel Debugging (TTD) reverse debugging toolkit. Prior to joining the Debuggers team in 2016, he was a member of the Visual C++ team, where he was responsible for the Microsoft C Run... Read More →


Tuesday September 26, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Atanasoff Hall Meydenbauer Center

2:00pm

Using Modern CMake Patterns to Enforce a Good Modular Design
CMake is the build system chosen by most open-source C++ projects. While it is fully capable of helping you enforce a good modular design, those features are usually not well known or understood.

In this talk I will present modern CMake practices that will simplify your project build and help you design better C++ components with clear dependencies and build interfaces (the sum of compile flags required to use a given library).

We will first do a quick recap of the theory behind modular design, most of it coming from John Lakos' work on Large Scale C++ Software Development. Then we will see a few of the legacy CMake patterns that can be found in a lot of open source projects and explain their shortcomings. We will learn how to create a clean C++ library using modern CMake practices and depend on it in others modules. Finally, we will explore the options available to export the build interfaces for use by external projects. In this last part a few external tools will be discussed such as pkg-config and Conan.

Speakers
avatar for Mathieu Ropert

Mathieu Ropert

Senior Developer, Murex
Mathieu is a Senior Developer at Murex where he works as a C++ expert and animates internal workshops & events. A long term open-source enthusiast, he tries to make C++ more portable across platforms. He is also co-host of the Paris C++ Meetup.


Tuesday September 26, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Colossus Theater Meydenbauer Center

3:15pm

Tools from the C++ eco-system to save a leg
C++ gives you enough rope to shoot your leg off. Readable (and thus easy to maintain, easy to support) and error-free code in C++ is often hard to achieve. And while modern C++ standards bring lots of fantastic opportunities and improvements to the language, sometimes they make the task of writing high quality code even harder. Or can’t we just cook them right? Can the tools help?

In this talk I’ll highlight the main trickiness of C++, including readability problems, some real-world issues, problems that grow out of C++ context-dependent parsing. I’ll then try to guide you in how to eliminate them using tools from the C++ eco-system. This will cover code styles and supportive tools, code generation snippets, code analysis (including CLion’s inspections and Data Flow Analysis, C++ Code Guidelines and clang-tidy checks), refactorings. I will also pay some attention to unit testing frameworks and dependency managers as tools that are essential for the high quality code development.

Speakers
avatar for Anastasia Kazakova

Anastasia Kazakova

Product Marketing Manager, JetBrains
As a C and C++ software developer, Anastasia Kazakova created real-time *nix-based systems and pushed them to production for 8 years. She has a passion for networking algorithms and embedded programming and believes in good tooling. With all her love for C++, she is now the Product Marketing Manager... Read More →


Tuesday September 26, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
ENIAC (404) Meydenbauer Center
 
Wednesday, September 27
 

9:00am

Bringing Clang-tidy Magic to Visual Studio C++ Developers
“A 14 year old code base under active development, 2.5 million lines of C++ code, a few brave nerds, two powerful tools and one hot summer…”, or “How we managed to clang-tidy our whole code base, while maintaining our monthly release cycle”. Did I mention that we’re a Windows-only dev team using Visual C++ ? That’s right, we’re going to continue using both Visual Studio (2017) and Clang tools on the side, to modernize and improve our code quality.

I’ve just come back from an interesting journey … and I want to share with you some of the most exciting experiences my team and I had along the way and a few things we’ve learned that you may take with you on your next “travels”. It all started a year ago, at CppCon, with a simple but life changing decision: we would stop worrying about whitespace and started our addiction on smart C++ tools with clang-format. We didn’t realize this at that time, but this was just the first leg of our great journey; next we decided to hop on the clang-tidy train and set out to modernize our aging code base and find hidden bugs along the way with clang-tidy static analyzer.

The hard part was getting all our code to compile with clang, using the correct project settings (synced with Visual Studio) and Windows SDK dependencies (our code has a fairly wide Windows API surface area). After that, clang-tidy was a breeze to use and we immediately integrated it in our workflow. I still cannot believe the code transformations we were able to do with its ‘modernize’ modules and some of the subtle latent bugs we found and fixed with its static analyzer and ‘cppcoreguidelines’.
Luckily, we took a lot of pictures and kept a detailed travel log, to share this fruitful journey with you, now. We’ll also share some tools we developed, to help you with this workflow: automation tips & configs (Jenkins, MSBuild), open-source PowerShell scripts (clang-tidy on Visual Studio projects), free Visual Studio extension and more.

Speakers
avatar for Victor Ciura

Victor Ciura

Technical Lead, CAPHYON
Victor Ciura is a Senior Software Engineer at CAPHYON and Technical Lead on the Advanced Installer team (http://www.advancedinstaller.com). | For over a decade, he designed and implemented several core components and libraries of Advanced Installer such as: IIS, Repackager, OS... Read More →



Wednesday September 27, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Ferranti (403) Meydenbauer Center

12:30pm

Optimizations and Debug Quality
Have you ever had an assert get triggered only to result in a useless core dump with missing variable information or an invalid callstack? Common factors that go into selecting a C or C++ compiler are: availability, correctness, compilation speed and application performance. A factor that is often neglected is debug information quality, which symbolic debuggers use to reconcile application executable state to the source-code form that is familiar to most software engineers.

When production builds of an application fail, the level of access to program state directly impacts the ability for a software engineer to investigate and fix a bug. If a compiler has optimized out a variable or is unable to express to a symbolic debugger how to reconstruct the value of a variable, the engineer’s investigation process is significantly impacted. Either the engineer has to attempt to recreate the problem, iterate through speculative fixes or attempt to perform prohibitively expensive debugging, such as reconstructing program state through executable code analysis.

This talk compares debug information quality between two popular compilers: gcc and clang. We will introduce the topic of optimization and highlight examples of their impact on debuggability. Attendees will walk away with a greater understanding of debuggability in their C++ applications.

Speakers
avatar for Samy Al Bahra

Samy Al Bahra

CTO/ Co-Founder, Backtrace
Samy Al Bahra is the cofounder of Backtrace, where he is helping build a modern debugging platform for today’s complex applications. Prior to Backtrace, Samy was a principal engineer at AppNexus, where he played a lead role in the architecture and development of many mission-crit... Read More →



Wednesday September 27, 2017 12:30pm - 1:30pm
ENIAC (404) Meydenbauer Center

3:15pm

There Will Be Build Systems: I Configure Your Milkshake
C++ (and C) have always had unique challenges when it comes to build systems. In addition to discussing the common problems that C++ build systems face, this talk will discuss the (abbreviated) history of build systems, where the current build system ecosystem is, where it is heading, and where it might be in the near future. Expect a lively presentation, that is both light on code and heavy on information.

Speakers
avatar for Isabella Muerte

Isabella Muerte

C++ Bruja, MNMLSTC
Isabella Muerte is a C++ Bruja and Build System Trash Goblin. She taught herself to program at 20 by writing a build system and immediately regretting the decision. Her first computer ran Windows Millennium Edition and her parents forbade her from upgrading to anything else for 5... Read More →


Wednesday September 27, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Harvard (406) Meydenbauer Center

4:45pm

Tools and Techniques To Stay Up-to-date With Modern C++
Since 2011, C++ has been on a massive roll. New C++ standards in 2011, 2014 and 2017. A growing number of new TSes and proposals for new features to be standardized. Following even just a few C++ luminaries on Twitter feels like drinking from a firehose: blog posts galore, radical new ideas, new techniques, new libraries, new conference videos, new open source projects... Does anyone else feel overwhelmed?

In this talk I will show you some techniques and tools to stay on top of modern C++ development and still keep your sanity.

I'll show you how to use various simple forms of testing to get acquainted with new and unfamilar C++ techniques, how to write your own Clang-based tools to explore new libraries and code bases, how to use simple Python scripts that make it easier to reason about some of the more opaque corners of C++ (e.g. the preprocessor and error messages), and more.

Speakers
avatar for Ingve Vormestrand

Ingve Vormestrand

IncludeOS
Ingve is a developer at IncludeOS, where he works on the implementation of a new unikernel operating system. His professional experience includes web and mobile app development, and he is very enthusiastic about open source.


Wednesday September 27, 2017 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Colossus Theater Meydenbauer Center

8:30pm

Optimizing Code Speed and Space with Build Time Switches
Our compilers and linkers are powerful tools and like many power tools, mastery means understanding the settings. Come join compiler experts to get your questions answered on how to get the best from your code whether you are building for speed or space.

This panel is presented by the Northwest C++ Users’ Group: http://nwcpp.org/

Moderators
avatar for Brett Searles

Brett Searles

Principal Architect, Attobotics
Work in hardware, embedded, graphics and web-based software space. Currently working on a Holographic Surgical Center to allow surgeons to perform simulated surgeries on real patient data. Also working with a major electronics distributor on a SAAS tool for their customers to eas... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Chandler Carruth

Chandler Carruth

Software Engineer, Google
Chandler Carruth leads the Clang team at Google, building better diagnostics, tools, and more. Previously, he worked on several pieces of Google’s distributed build system. He makes guest appearances helping to maintain a few core C++ libraries across Google’s codebase, and is active in the LLVM and Clang open source communities. He received his M.S. and B.S. in Computer Science from Wake Forest University, but disavows all knowledge of the contents of his... Read More →
avatar for Matt Godbolt

Matt Godbolt

Senior Software Engineer, DRW
Matt Godbolt is a software engineer with trading firm DRW, and the creator of the Compiler Explorer website. He is passionate about writing efficient code. He has previously worked at on mobile apps at Google, run his own C++ tools company and spent more than a decade making cons... Read More →
avatar for Jim Radigan

Jim Radigan

VC++ Sr. Architect, Microsoft


Wednesday September 27, 2017 8:30pm - 10:00pm
ENIAC (404) Meydenbauer Center
 
Thursday, September 28
 

9:00am

Building C++ Modules
C++ Modules TS is now implemented (to various degrees) by GCC, Clang, and MSVC. The aim of this talk is to provide practical information on the mechanics of creating and consuming modules with these compilers. It is based on our experience adding modules support to the build2 toolchain and then modularizing some of its components.

We start with a brief introduction to C++ modules, why we need them, and how they relate to other physical design mechanisms, namely headers, namespaces, and libraries.

Next we explore the kind of integration modules will require from a C++ build system. Specifically, when and where a module binary interface is built? How can a build system discover which modules are needed? What are the implications for parallel and distributed builds? Can we finally get rid of the preprocessor? And what happens to header-only libraries in this brave new modularized world?

With a firm understanding of the implications C++ modules have on the build process, we can try to answer some of the module design questions: What is an appropriate module granularity? Should we have separate module interface and implementation units? Can we have a dual header/module interface for legacy support? Are module-only libraries to become all the rage?

Speakers
avatar for Boris Kolpackov

Boris Kolpackov

Chief Hacking Officer, Code Synthesis
Boris Kolpackov is a founder and CHO (Chief Hacking Officer) at Code Synthesis, a company focusing on the development of open-source tools and libraries for C++. For the past 10 years Boris has been working on solving interesting problems in the context of C++ using domain-specif... Read More →


Thursday September 28, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Colossus Theater Meydenbauer Center

2:00pm

Practical Techniques for Improving C++ Build Times
Slow builds block all C++ developers from the work being done. At Facebook we have a huge codebase, where the time spent compiling C++ sources grows significantly faster than the size of the repository. In this talk we will share our practical experience optimizing build times, in some cases from several hours to just a few minutes. The majority of the techniques are open sourced or generic and can be immediately applied to your codebase.

Facebook strives to squeeze build speed out of everything: starting from a distributed build system, through the compiler toolchain and ending with code itself. We will dive into different strategies of calculating cache keys, potential caching traps and approaches to improve cache efficiency. We tune the compiler, specifically with compilation flags, profile data and link time options. We will talk about the benchmarks we use to track improvements and detect regressions and what challenges we face there. Finally, you will learn about our unsuccessful approaches with an explanation of why they didn't work out for us.

Speakers
avatar for Dmitry Panin

Dmitry Panin

Software Engineer, Facebook
Dmitry is a software engineer at Facebook working in Ads Infrastructure Team. He has been contributing to efficiency, scalability and reliability of C++ backend services responsible for ads delivery. He is currently hacking on Facebook's build infrastructure and C++ codebase itse... Read More →


Thursday September 28, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Atanasoff Hall Meydenbauer Center
 
Friday, September 29
 

10:30am

Optimizing compilation times of Generated Code with Templates
At Facebook, the main bottlenecks in build times are caused by auto-generated code from our core RPC Framework. Through the use of templates we were able to obtain up to 50% build speedup in our slowest compiling files. Generic programming is usually avoided because it slows down compile times. Why is it that, in this case, the use of templates actually improved it?

This talk will take a deep-dive into the entire compilation process, from parsing and linking to template instantiation and code optimizations. It will teach you how to gather concrete data on these build steps and the techniques used to move code to templates while reducing build times.

https://github.com/eduardo-elizondo/cppcon2017

Speakers
avatar for Eddie Elizondo

Eddie Elizondo

Software Engineer, Facebook
Eddie is a Software Engineer working with Core Systems at Facebook



Friday September 29, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Colossus Theater Meydenbauer Center

2:45pm

Unbolting the Compiler's Lid: What Has My Compiler Done for Me Lately?
In 2012, Matt and a colleague were arguing whether it was efficient to use the then-new-fangled range for. During the discussion a bash script was written to quickly compile C++ source and dump the assembly. Five years later and that script has grown into a website relied on by many to quickly see the code their compiler emits, to compare different compilers' code generation and behaviour, to quickly prototype and share code, and investigate the effect of optimization flags.

In this talk Matt will not only show you how easy (and fun!) it is to understand the assembly code generated by your compiler, but also how important it can be. He'll explain how he uses Compiler Explorer in his day job programming low-latency trading systems, and show some real-world examples. He'll demystify assembly code and give you the tools to understand and appreciate how hard your compiler works for you.

He'll also talk a little about how Compiler Explorer works behind the scenes, how it is maintained and deployed, and  share some stories about how it has changed over the years. By the end of this session you'll be itching to take your favourite code snippets and start exploring what your compiler does with them.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Godbolt

Matt Godbolt

Senior Software Engineer, DRW
Matt Godbolt is a software engineer with trading firm DRW, and the creator of the Compiler Explorer website. He is passionate about writing efficient code. He has previously worked at on mobile apps at Google, run his own C++ tools company and spent more than a decade making cons... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 2:45pm - 4:30pm
Berry Hall Meydenbauer Center

4:45pm

Implementing C++ Modules in G++

C++ modules-ts[1] proposes a module system, with defined interfaces, implementations and importing. I shall outline the new semantics, their impact on the ABI and build systems, and discuss the, in-progress, implementation in the GNU C++ Compiler.

[1] JTC1/SC22/WG21/n4681, 'Working Draft, Extensions to C++ for Modules', 2017-07-14, Gabriel Dos Reis


Speakers
avatar for Nathan Sidwell

Nathan Sidwell

Software Engineer, Facebook
Nathan is a developer of the GNU Compiler Collection, particularly the C++ Front End. His current major project is implementing the modules TS.


Friday September 29, 2017 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Harvard (406) Meydenbauer Center

4:45pm

C++/WinRT and the Future of C++ on Windows
This talk highlights efforts by Kenny Kerr, Herb Sutter, Gabriel Dos Reis, and others to make Windows a great place for C++ developers, replacing proprietary extensions and tools with standard C++ code. The talk begins with a quick introduction on what C++/WinRT is, how it helps make it super simple to create projects targeting Windows that use just ordinary C++ code, how the project uses advanced C++17 and TS features today, the roadmap for the next few months, and then how we’re looking ahead at things like modules and metaclasses to dramatically improve the way we think of and use C++ on Windows.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Jones

Scott Jones

Senior Software Engineer, Microsoft
Scott works on several diagnostics features of Microsoft Windows, including Windows Device Portal, WinRT diagnostic APIs, and the browser's F12 network tracing. A few months ago, Scott joined Kenny Kerr to develop and ship the C++/WinRT projection library.
avatar for Kenny Kerr

Kenny Kerr

Microsoft
Kenny is an author, systems programmer, and the creator of C++/WinRT. He is also an engineer on the Windows team at Microsoft where he is changing the way developers approach OS and app development with beautiful high-performance libraries and tools.


Friday September 29, 2017 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Ferranti (403) Meydenbauer Center

4:45pm

My Little Object File: How Linkers Implement C++
Ever wonder how the linker turns your compiled C++ code into an executable file? Why the One Definition Rule exists? Or why your debug builds are so large? In this talk we'll take a deep dive and follow the story of our three adventurers, ELF, MachO, and COFF as they make their way out of Objectville carrying C++ translation units on their backs as they venture to become executables. We'll see as they make their way through the tangled forests of name mangling, climb the cliffs of thread local storage, and wade through the bogs of debug info. We'll see how they mostly follow the same path, but each approach the journey in their own way. 

We'll also see that becoming an executable is not quite the end of their journey, as the dynamic linker awaits to bring them to yet a higher plane of existence as complete C++ programs running on a machine. 

Speakers
MS

Michael Spencer

Compiler Engineer, Sony Interactive Entertainment
Michael Spencer is a Compiler Engineer at Sony Interactive Entertainment where he has spent 6 years works on PlayStation's C++ toolchain. He is an active member of the LLVM community focusing on object files and linkers. He also serves as Sony's representative to the ISO C++ stan... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Colossus Theater Meydenbauer Center